From as early as I can remember, I have always wanted to eat at a Michelin starred restaurant. Ramsey and MP-White first  opened my eyes to different cooking through their UK shows.

D2 Hong Kong Michelin 2 Star

Lack of money in the UK, and opportunity in Australia (Michelin still don’t rate Au restaurants) led us to today. Even though we booked, the restaurant accepted walk ins.

Sun Tung Lok (Tsim Sha Tsui) – We were greeted at the door and led to our table. Our jackets were removed by the staff, followed by the staff helping us into our chairs.

Over the next 2 hours (11.30 to 13.30), we tasted our way through 6 delicious dishes. The staff were very attentive in describing each dish, and refilling our cups with numerous and generous amounts of Jasmine tea.

D2 Hong Kong Michelin 2 Star

Dim sum platter by the Chef –

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D2 Hong Kong Michelin 2 Star

 

Double boiled chicken soup with Matsutake and Hokkaido sea cucumber –

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D2 Hong Kong Michelin 2 Star

Steamed spotted groupa fillet with black fish roe, bean curd, ham and egg yolk –

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D2 Hong Kong Michelin 2 Star

Slow cooked grain fed bone-in beef –

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D2 Hong Kong Michelin 2 Star

Shrimp dumplings and Chinese lettuce –

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D2 Hong Kong Michelin 2 Star

Deep fried glutinous ball stuffed with custard and bird’s nest –

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D2 Hong Kong Harbour

On a cold and foggy afternoon, or was it a haze: we were not sure, but we made the walk down to the harbour. Our first proper hunt for a view. Since we arrived, the landscape has been covered in a blanket of fog or haze. The highways are packed with double decker buses ferrying passengers from all points to all points. Little red taxis fight for the position of the lanes. 6 lanes down Nathan Road. Even though the lanes have white lines in between them, I think they are only there for decoration.

D2 Hong Kong Harbour

On arriving at the harbor, and despite the fog/haze, you could still see over to Hong Kong Island. Green and cream ferries delivering passengers from the Star Ferry terminal to points on the other side. A couple of old “Junks” modernized with engines, ploughing their away through the waters. The tops of building lit up with the flashing neon advertising. Left and right, the view went for miles/kilometers. The green and red tugboat brightened up a grey harbour preparing for its next arm wrestle with larger tankers further on up. All around us, Hong Kong is gearing up for the Chinese New Year (Year of the Dog – 16th February 2018). Over at the Peninsula Hotel, the read lanterns dart around in the breeze.

 

D2 Hong Kong Temple Street

D2 Hong Kong Temple Street

The Temple Street Market is fascinating. Around every corner is a treat waiting to be discovered. Whilst the TSM is in itself, a free flowing market full of hawkers and Arthur Daleys, the atmosphere radiates genuine hard working people eaking out a living. Really hardworking. The markets is an example of one of the few remaining night markets. By day, the streets are full of bustling people and traffic fighting for space and pathways.

In Australia, we have what we call “vertical heart-attacks“. People who for know reason, stop dead in the mall or the street. Their gaze usually transfixed by their implanted mobile device calling out to them like an attention seeking child. In Hong Kong, devices are second nature. Walking, talking, aping etc, all happening whilst travelling along. A selfie at every corner. Strangely, it all appears natural.

Tonight, we found a stall selling fresh meats, chickens, ducks and other delicacies. Preserved duck fillets. The smell was amazing. Chinese pork sausage, often used in stir fry, glistening in the night sky.

For eating, we stayed off the intestines. Tonight was walk and eat. Grazing from vendor to vendor. First up, and top of one list was spicy fish balls. Four balls on a skewer, Crunchy and tasty. Salt chicken. Salt and pepper chicken pieces, fried up. Roasting hot and crunchy to the end. Lastly, thin layers of duck breast, skewered on a griddle and brushed with a marinade.

Yummy.

One thought on “Day 2 – Hong Kong – Michelin 2 Star

  1. Mum says:

    Very interesting and informative,Ian draws. A good picture of what you are doing and seeing,we can almost taste the food,. Looking forward to next chapter.

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